New Year’s Meme

30/12/2009

1. What did you do in 2009 that you’d never done before?
Host my first Lolita meet-up in April ♥

2. Did you keep your New Year’s resolutions, and will you make more for next year?
I honestly don’t even remember what I said I’d do.

3. Did anyone close to you give birth?
Hmm… not really close, but my co-worker gave birth on the 14th of december 😀 Autumn Deshazer.

4. Did anyone close to you die?
My great-grandmother MeaMa, and Jasmine You from Versailles

5. What travels did you embark on this year?
I went to San Francisco for the Grand Opening of Baby, The Stars Shine Bright

6. What would you like to have in 2010 that you lacked in 2009?
I wanted to travel more! (^__^)

7. What date from 2009 will remain etched upon your memory, and why?

There are so many :O When I visited my great grandmother in the hospital. I also remember ice skating in my lolita outfit. Meeting Misako-san at the BABY Opening.

8. What was your biggest achievement of the year?
Keeping a job for more than a year.

9. What was your biggest failure?
Not keeping myself happy above all else.

10. Did you suffer illness or injury?
I had mono for 2 weeks :< That was really horrible!

11. What was the best thing you bought?
My Alice and the Pirates JSK ♥ and GLB’s

12. Whose behavior merited celebration?
Hmm I dont have an answer for this one.

13. Whose behavior made you appalled and depressed?

I am not sure with this one either (;_;)

14. Where did most of your money go?
Art supplies XD

15. What did you get really, really, really excited about?
My trip to SF, the BABY Opening ♥

16. What song will always remind you of 2009?
“Ophelia”-Kaya

17. Compared to this time last year, are you:

i. happier or sadder? Sadder (;_;) But this was towards the end of the year

ii. thinner or fatter? I’m always ALWAYS the same.

iii. richer or poorer? Richer, I wasn’t making very much this time last year.

18. What do you wish you’d done more of?

More art and lolita-related projects

19. What do you wish you’d done less of?
Being lazy (;-;)

20. How will you be spending Christmas?
I spent Christmas with family and Aria ♥

22. Did you fall in love in 2009?
I’ve been in love for the past 4 years ♥ My love keeps growing everyday

23. How many one-night stands?
NONE! I would NEVER do that

24. What was your favorite TV program?
I don’t have a tv 😛 I usually get netflix

25. Do you hate anyone now that you didn’t hate this time last year?
I am not sure

26. What was the best book you read?
“Royal Escape”- Georgette Heyer

27. What was your greatest musical discovery?
Nega, Aicle, Eve Of Destiny <- Visual Kei artists

28. What did you want and get?
I wanted a bugs life on DVD, and got it 😀

29. What did you want and not get?
An mp3 player or ipod (I had an ipod, but someone stole it!) (;-;)

30. What was your favorite film of this year?
X-men Origins: Wolverine or Coraline

31. What did you do on your birthday?
I worked… (;-;) But after that I got to see Aria ♥

32. What one thing would have made your year immeasurably more satisfying?
Being with Aria ♥

33. How would you describe your personal fashion concept in 2009?
I should take more care of myself 😀 I have been really girly this year and I really like it ♥ It’s really opposite to what I use to be

34. What kept you sane?
Lolita fashion, Aria ♥ My art and poetry

35. Which celebrity/public figure did you fancy the most?
Vivienne Westwood

36. What political issue stirred you the most?
States banning gay marriage :-<

37. Who did you miss?
My great-grandmother, MeaMa

38. Who was the best new person you met?
I haven’t really met anyone new (;-;)

39. Tell us a valuable life lesson you learned in 2009.
Take care of yourself before anyone else.

40. Quote a song lyric that sums up your year.
“No matter how high the wall, we crossed over it
Why are you not here anymore? I want to see you…”- Versailles (From Serenade)

What Is Your Resolution For 2010?
In 2010, I’m going to keep myself happy and healthy. I would like to start my shop on etsy and have my own lolita brand ♥

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Day 10: Christmas Cards

The sending of greeting cards at Christmas began in the Victorian era. Although wood engravers produced prints with religious themes in the European Middle Ages, the first commercial Christmas and New Year’s card is believed to have been designed and printed in London, England in 1843.

First Christmas Card

In 1843 an edition of 1,000 of these Christmas cards was placed on sale in London. They were printed in lithography by Jobbins of Warwick Court, Holborn, London, and hand-colored by a professional “colourer” named Mason.
John Callcott Horsley (born 1817– died 1903), a British narrative painter and a Royal Academician, designed the very first Christmas and New Year’s card at the request of his friend Sir Henry Cole (the first director of the Victoria and Albert Museum). Cole suggested the idea of a specially designed form of greeting to send to friends at Christmas. In 1843 an edition of 1,000 of these Christmas cards were printed and placed on sale in London. They were printed in lithography by Jobbins of Warwick Court, Holborn, London, and hand-colored by a professional “colourer” named Mason. The cards were published under Sir Henry Cole’s nom de guerre, “Felix Summerly”—by his friend Joseph Cundall, of New Bond Street.
The Christmas card was lithographed on stiff cardboard, 5 1/8 by 3 1/4 inches, in dark sepia, with a design of a trellis of rustic-work, in the Germanesque style, divided into a center and two side panels. In the panels were figures representing two of the acts of charity, “feeding the hungry” and “clothing the naked.” In the center is a picture of a merry family party, including three generations, grandparents to grandchildren, quaffing draughts of wine. Below is the greeting, “A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to You.” The card is marked: “Published at Summerly’s Home Treasury Office, 12 Old Bond Street, London.” The price was $1. each.
That was the beginning. The following year there were other picture-makers, and the Christmas card was launched on the tide of popular favor; but it was not until the idea had grown out of favor among artistic and literary circles that it was taken up by a business man, Goodall. Charles Goodall & Son, a British publisher of visiting cards was one of the first to mass produce Christmas cards and visiting cards. In 1866 Mr. Josiah Goodall commissioned Messrs. Marcus Ward & Co., of Belfast, to lithograph, for his firm, a set of four designs by C. H. Bennett, and in the following year another set by the same artist. These, together with Luke Limner’s border design of holly, mistletoe, and robins, may be taken as the forerunners of today’s Christmas card.
The Christmas card publishing industry created unheard of opportunities for artists, writers, printers, and engravers. In 1880 the Christmas card had a new birth, for it was then that a great London firm offered five hundred guineas in prizes for the most artistic designs. Many of the great artists of the day responded with their best ideas. Kate Greenaway, Walter Crane, and Thomas Crane were among the many 19th century artists famous for their greeting card designs. In addition, literary writers saw the opportunity; they gave to the beauty of the painting the music of their words. Many well-known writers were not above this profitable work of creating greeting cards. Thousands of pounds were spent in finding the right poems and suitable Christmas sentiments, until at last these Yuletide offerings reached the climax of their literary and artistic excellence.
An original copy of Horsley’s Christmas card is considered very rare. The Christmas card publishers, Messrs De La Rue, reproduced the original design by chromolithography in 1881; and then copies of this reprint were issued in 1955 and can still be found today.

The sending of greeting cards at Christmas began in the Victorian era. Although wood engravers produced prints with religious themes in the European Middle Ages, the first commercial Christmas and New Year’s card is believed to have been designed and printed in London, England in 1843.
In 1843 an edition of 1,000 of these Christmas cards was placed on sale in London. They were printed in lithography by Jobbins of Warwick Court, Holborn, London, and hand-colored by a professional “colourer” named Mason. John Callcott Horsley (born 1817– died 1903), a British narrative painter and a Royal Academician, designed the very first Christmas and New Year’s card at the request of his friend Sir Henry Cole (the first director of the Victoria and Albert Museum). Cole suggested the idea of a specially designed form of greeting to send to friends at Christmas. In 1843 an edition of 1,000 of these Christmas cards were printed and placed on sale in London. They were printed in lithography by Jobbins of Warwick Court, Holborn, London, and hand-colored by a professional “colourer” named Mason. The cards were published under Sir Henry Cole’s nom de guerre, “Felix Summerly”—by his friend Joseph Cundall, of New Bond Street.

The Christmas card was lithographed on stiff cardboard, 5 1/8 by 3 1/4 inches, in dark sepia, with a design of a trellis of rustic-work, in the Germanesque style, divided into a center and two side panels. In the panels were figures representing two of the acts of charity, “feeding the hungry” and “clothing the naked.” In the center is a picture of a merry family party, including three generations, grandparents to grandchildren, quaffing draughts of wine. Below is the greeting, “A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to You.” The card is marked: “Published at Summerly’s Home Treasury Office, 12 Old Bond Street, London.” The price was $1. each.

That was the beginning. The following year there were other picture-makers, and the Christmas card was launched on the tide of popular favor; but it was not until the idea had grown out of favor among artistic and literary circles that it was taken up by a business man, Goodall. Charles Goodall & Son, a British publisher of visiting cards was one of the first to mass produce Christmas cards and visiting cards. In 1866 Mr. Josiah Goodall commissioned Messrs. Marcus Ward & Co., of Belfast, to lithograph, for his firm, a set of four designs by C. H. Bennett, and in the following year another set by the same artist. These, together with Luke Limner’s border design of holly, mistletoe, and robins, may be taken as the forerunners of today’s Christmas card.

The Christmas card publishing industry created unheard of opportunities for artists, writers, printers, and engravers. In 1880 the Christmas card had a new birth, for it was then that a great London firm offered five hundred guineas in prizes for the most artistic designs. Many of the great artists of the day responded with their best ideas. Kate Greenaway, Walter Crane, and Thomas Crane were among the many 19th century artists famous for their greeting card designs. In addition, literary writers saw the opportunity; they gave to the beauty of the painting the music of their words. Many well-known writers were not above this profitable work of creating greeting cards. Thousands of pounds were spent in finding the right poems and suitable Christmas sentiments, until at last these Yuletide offerings reached the climax of their literary and artistic excellence.

An original copy of Horsley’s Christmas card is considered very rare. The Christmas card publishers, Messrs De La Rue, reproduced the original design by chromolithography in 1881; and then copies of this reprint were issued in 1955 and can still be found today.


My Christmas Card design~ 2009

Day 11: Holiday treats #2

Handmade Christmas Card- Design by Me ❤

What a year it has been! (^___^) I am so thankful~ I hope that all of you will have a safe and fun holiday! ♥ I look forward to writing more~

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Day 9: “How to make” Post- Involves crafts and fun!

Christmas Crafts are always fun to make! ♥ From candy cane reindeer to marshmallow snowmen. There are so many things to make!


Here are a few to choose from:

*Christmas Tree- Made from paper~ A 3-D model

This christmas tree model looks difficult at first. Once you make a few, it’s quite fun~

TIPS:

*** Keep the colored part of your paper on the outside!

*** Take your time~ You don’t want to accidentally cut out one of your branches

*** Use different colors, patterns, and prints for your paper!

*** Use tape or glue to keep your tree together

*** Add some sparkle and beads to your tree

Paper Christmas Tree (3-D model)

*Snowflakes- The old-fashion paper snowflake!

This model is really neat! It’s really different to the snowflakes I use to make~

TIPS:

*** Make a goal on how many snowflakes you can design~

***Use different ribbons to hang your snowflakes

***Take some food coloring and splatter onto your snowflake

***Use different types of paper! Even foil!

Paper Snowflakes

Paper doll- Christmas Bear

This paper doll is perfect for christmas cards, ornaments, and gift tags.

Paper Evergreens

Tools and Materials

* Adjustable circle cutter
* Green card stock, from paperpresentation.com
* Bone Folder
* Scissors
* Wooden skewers
* Hot-glue gun
* 1 1/8-inch (for small trees) and 1 15/16-inch (for large trees) wooden spools, by Woodworks, from craftparts.com

Directions

Step 1

For large Christmas trees, use an adjustable circle cutter to make 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-inch-diameter circles from green card stock (for small trees, omit the 6-inch circle).

Step 2

Fold each circle in half 4 times with a bone folder. While circles are folded, snip off the tip of each piece, forming a very small hole in center.

Step 3

Place smallest circle on the pointed end of a wooden skewer (we used 12-inch skewers), letting the tip poke through the hole in circle. With a hot-glue gun, dab underside of circle, where paper and skewer meet. Hold for 10 seconds to secure.

Step 4

Working 1 at a time from smallest circle to largest, slide remaining circles onto skewer; secure with glue.

Step 5

Insert bottom of skewer into a spool; remove, and cut skewer to desired height (we cut ours to 6, 9, and 10 inches), keeping in mind that only spool should be visible beneath standing tree. Return skewer to spool; secure with glue. Add a dot of glue to top of skewer, and attach a gold bead.

Lovely crafts for everyone to enjoy! Share with your family and friends~

Next stop~ ♥

Day 10: Christmas Cards

Day 8: Christmas plants: An introduction

There are many traditions associated with the holidays. Many involve plants. Evergreen trees, poinsettias, holly, and mistletoe played important roles in ancient legends and rituals, but have evolved into traditions associated with the Christmas season.

The Christmas Tree


The Christmas tree is a tradition which began in Germany in the seventeenth century. There are several legends concerning the origin of the Christmas tree. Historians do know that the primitive cultures of northern Europe believed that evergreen trees possessed godlike powers. The evergreen tree also symbolized immortality. The Germanic peoples would bring evergreen boughs into their homes during winter to insure the protection of the home and the return of life to the snow-covered forest. As Christianity spread throughout Europe, eventually the evergreen tree was transformed into a Christian symbol.

Some believe the Christmas tree evolved from the Paradise Tree of the Middle Ages. During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, evergreen trees played an important role in miracle and mystery plays. One such play dramatized the fall of Adam and Eve and was performed on December 24. On stage during the play was a Paradise Tree (an evergreen with red apples hung from its branches).

Others believe that the Christmas tree began in the sixteenth century with Martin Luther. According to the legend, Martin Luther was inspired by the beauty of evergreens one Christmas Eve. He cut down a tree, brought it home, and decorated it with candles.

The first record of a Christmas tree is in Strasburg, Germany in 1604. German immigrants and Hessian soldiers hired by the British to fight the colonists during the American Revolution brought the Christmas tree tradition to the United States.

Poinsettias

Lovely Poinsettia

Poinsettias are native to Mexico. They were cultivated by the Aztec Indians. The colorful bracts were used to make a reddish purple dye. The Aztecs also made a fever medicine from the poinsettia’s milky sap.

After the Spanish conquest and the introduction of Christianity, poinsettias began to be used in Christian rituals. Franciscan priests used the poinsettia in their nativity processions.

Poinsettias were first introduced into the United States by Joel Robert Poinsett, the first U.S. Ambassador to Mexico. Poinsett had plants sent to his home in South Carolina. He then distributed plants to horticultural friends and botanical gardens. The Ecke family of California has been instrumental in the development of today’s poinsettia.

Initially poinsettias lasted only a few days in the home. All had red bracts. Today’s varieties are more compact, durable, and long-lasting. Red, pink, white, gold, marbled, and variegated varieties are now available.

Mistletoe

Mistletoe is a semi-parasitic plant with small, leathery leaves and small, white berries. Mistletoe plants manufacture their own food, but must obtain water and minerals from the host plant.

American mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum) can be found growing in deciduous trees from New Jersey and southern Indiana southward to Florida and Texas. It is the state flower of Oklahoma. Mistletoe sold during the holiday season is gathered in the wild. Most mistletoe is harvested in Oklahoma and Texas.

Traditions involving mistletoe date back to ancient times. Druids believed that mistletoe could bestow health and good luck. Welsh farmers associated mistletoe with fertility. A good mistletoe crop foretold a good crop the following season. Mistletoe was also thought to influence human fertility and was prescribed to individuals who had problems bearing children. Mistletoe has also been used in medicine. It has been used as treatment for pleurisy, gout, epilepsy, rabies, and poisoning. Mistletoe also played a role in a superstition concerning marriage. It was believed that kissing under the mistletoe increased the possibility of marriage in the upcoming year.

Although mistletoe has been used in the treatment of several ailments, the berries are poisonous. Individuals using mistletoe during the holiday season should keep the sprigs out of the reach of children. For safety reasons, many companies have replaced the berries with artificial, plastic berries.

Holly

Holly was considered sacred by the ancient Romans. Holly was used to honor Saturn, god of agriculture, during their Saturnalia festival held during the winter solstice. The Romans gave one another holly wreaths, carried it in processions, and decked images of Saturn with it. During the early years of the Christian religion in Rome, many Christians continued to deck their homes with holly to avoid detection and persecution by Roman authorities. Gradually, holly became a symbol of Christmas as Christianity became the dominant religion of the empire.

Wassailing

A Great Festive Event

Wassailing is the tradition of going from house to house caroling, eating, drinking, and socializing with friends and relatives. Wassailing, however, was originally an important part of a horticultural ritual. In England, it focused on the apple orchards. The purpose was to salute the trees in the dead of winter to insure a good crop for the coming year. The date varied across the 12 days of Christmas. If done formally, the wassail procession visited the principal orchards of the area, caroling as it went. In each orchard, major trees were selected and cider or liquor was sprinkled over their root systems. Incantations such as (see below) were recited:

Stand fast at root,
Bear well at top,
Every twig bear apple big,
Every bow bear apple now.

or

Here’s to thee old apple tree,
Hats full, sacks full,
Great bushel baskets full,
Hurrah!

To frighten evil spirits away, guns were fired into the air. Before proceeding, the procession usually danced about the honored trees and then snaked its way out of the orchard. The care with which the ceremony had been executed was measured by the crop yield the following year.

As you celebrate this holiday season with friends and relatives, enjoy the Christmas traditions and the ancient rituals and legends associated with them.

A little history to go with your Holiday spirit and festivities~ ♥

Next up:

Day 9: “How to make” Post- Involves crafts and fun!

Day 7: Christmas Wrapping- Bows, paper, tape!

Finding presents under the Christmas tree is always exciting ♥ Little bows with different colored wrapping paper. A Christmas card hanging from a tree branch. Even some yummy confection in your stocking!

Now, would all of this be interesting if your presents weren’t wrapped?

That’s what I thought 😉

Today’s post is going to show you how some ideas and tips on wrapping your holiday gifts:

  • Doily Gift wrap– For an extra touch of whimsy, wrap gifts with doilies.

Doilies

  • Homemade confections are twice as nice when delivered in pudding molds, loaf pans, and other culinary containers. You can find a variety of types and sizes at kitchen-supply stores. Long after the contents are devoured, the equipment will still be useful.

    Christmas Goodies

  • Gift tags are all the sweeter when they happen to be crisp cookies. To make them, cut gingerbread dough into shapes or letters, punch with a small hole for threading with cord, and bake. The cookies can be eaten while the unwrapping takes place, or hung on a tree as ornaments.

Yummy gift tags

How to make a fabric gift bag

1. Cut two pieces of your fabric and two pieces of the lining material all to the same size. Any size, any shape rectangle. A variety of sizes is useful, and square or “close to square” rectangles are the most versatile shapes.

2. Put each fabric piece on top of each lining piece, fold over the top edges and sew. Just the top edges. Now you’ve hemmed the opening edge of the Gift Bag.

3. Stack both sets of fabric with the lining (inside) faces to the outside. The decorative fabric pieces will be facing each other on the inside of the “sandwich”. Be sure the hemmed edges are both on top. Sew the three un-hemmed edges with a simple running stitch, 1/4″ in from the edge.

4. Turn inside out. Set a generous length of ribbon about 2″ down from the top, and tack it to the bag with a few stitches in the middle of the ribbon length.


Gift Bags- Instructions

♥  Good luck with all of your holiday gifts~

Stay tuned for:

Day 8: Christmas plants: An introduction

Day 6: Christmas Decorations

In spirit of the Holiday Season, I have decided to decorate my whole  house with Christmas Decorations. I’ve made bows, snowflakes, and christmas trees.

~My Christmas Lights~

What makes your home so inviting during the holidays? Is it the mistletoe by the front door? Or the Christmas lights on your tree?

Here, I’ve gathered a few ideas to share with you. Some of old tradition and some of the new.

Christmas Decorations

  • Create a beautiful Victorian Christmas tree with garlands of pearls, silk roses, feathered birds and clip-on candles.
  • Make snowflakes out of colored paper! Then sprinkle with glitter~ Hang them all about the house, or your room!
  • Make a simple bow garland ♥

    Traditional Garland

  • Put out some Holiday candles. Different scents in each room~ (I suggest 2-3 candles, so that it’s not too strong) Cranberry, Cinnamon, Vanilla, and Pumpkin are great scents ♥
  • Hang some of your Christmas ornaments in your room~ Make a theme! (Like winter wonderland or victorian christmas)
  • Put up some Christmas lights in each room(excluding the bathroom- you don’t want an accident!) It doesn’t have to be big~ The lights will add some Christmas cheer to your home
  • Make a Christmas card display~ With bells and ribbons!

    Modern Christmas Card Display

    Enjoy all of your Christmas Decorations~ ♥

    Day 7: Christmas Wrapping- Bows, paper, tape!

Day 5: Christmas Movie List- “Favorites”

When it’s snowing and I made myself a nice cup of tea (or hot cocoa!), I like to watch a few Christmas Movies. Normally, I watch a new one each night, if I can.

Rudolph, the Red Nosed Reindeer

Here are my Favorite Christmas Movies:

1. Christmas Carol (1999)

2. Charlie Brown Christmas (1965)

3. Jack Frost (TV special, 1975)

4. The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

5. How the Grinch stole Christmas (1966)

6. Samantha: An American Girl Holiday (90’s)

Clip from A Christmas Carol:

Enjoy all of your Holiday favorites! (^___^)


Day 6: Christmas Decorations

Day 4: A Christmas Song- The “Favorites”

I’ve been drawn to the classical Christmas songs like instrumentals and old 1950’s ads.  It feels enchanting, heart-warming and comfortable. In Christmas specials, you’ll find a message that often shows joy and happiness. “The goodness of man-kind”, so to speak. It was often used to bring up the country’s morale in harsh times. (Especially during war-time).

A good example:

Children’s Christmas Music

As a child I grew up watching a million Disney movies, who doesn’t? (^__^)

There was one movie called “Disney Sing-Alongs” on VHS. The Christmas Version had clips from various Christmas Specials. One that I remember quite well is “Dance with the Sugar Plum Fairy”. The colors are soft, along with the animation. A gentle touch that goes well with the music. I am fond of the fairies and the environment in which they dance in. You may notice that the only colors you see are the fairies. As the movie progresses, the scenery sparkles and glows.

Favorite Christmas Songs:

1. “Mele Kalikimaka”- Bing Crosby and the Andrew Sisters

***My Great Grandmother lived in Hawaii for several years. She was a great influence in my life ♥ During Christmas we would have a fake Palm Tree with lights instead of a Christmas Tree. Everyone would say “Mele Kalikimaka- Merry Christmas”

2. “Let it snow”- Dean Martin

3. “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree”- Brenda Lee

4. “Für Elise”- Charlie Brown Special

5.  “What’s This?”- The Nightmare Before Christmas

6. “You’re a mean one, Mr. Grinch”- Dr. Seuss (How the Grinch Stole Christmas)

This concludes another Christmas post! (^__^) Enjoy your holiday music~

Victorian Christmas Caroling

Day 5: Christmas Movie List- “Favorites”

Day 3: Holiday Outfits

As the weather gets colder, you usually end finding yourself in extra layers. Sometimes layers can be too much. So, I always find it handy to keep these items in my bag:

The Basics

*Scarves: I must have 5 or 6 of these! In all lengths! I tend to get brightly colored ones~

*Mittens/Gloves: I always buy 2-3 pairs, in different colors. You can also get matching hats or scarves to go with them!

*Ear muffs: A cute accessory, it also keeps your ears warm~

*Hats: A must! 90% of your body heat escapes through your upper body.

*Shoes/Boots: Whether you are wearing regular shoes or boots, it’s best to get something that keeps you warm. Try to get boots that are water-poof. Even rain boots are nice! (You can always add your own flair to them~)

*Legwarmers: You either love them or hate them. In my opinion, I find these to be very comfortable. They are great for going on walks or even just lounging around the house.

*Bloomers: My best friend! 😀 They keep your thighs warm and they also add a little modesty~ We don’t want anyone peeking 😉 Bloomers can come in many colors and styles. White and Black being traditional, you may also find a pair with an ice-cream cone print!

Colors:

Now that the holiday season is here, I see a lot of people (mostly women) wearing Christmas jewelry. Those kinds of things are nice and traditional. I also see a lot of greens and reds, the typical holiday colors.

Lately, I have been expanding my wardrobe’s color scheme. It can to my attention that I’ve been wearing the same kinds of colors for such a long time.

Here is a guide to help you grow into some new colors:

*Go through your closet, examine which color clothing you have the most of.

*Take a look at a this color wheel:

Colorwheel

*Now, I suggest that you pick a color that is opposite from what you have already. (eg. say that you have a lot of green in your closet, you would then choose red)

*Next, I suggest that you start out small. Get a feel for your new color! Pick out some jewelry, bows, socks. Even a new pair of shoes~

***Please note that your items do not have to be the same shade! They can be dark or light!

Christmas Motifs:

One reason why I love the holiday season is it’s holiday motifs~ You can find animals, fruits, flowers, it can go on!

Here are a list of things you mind like to add to your outfit:

*Flowers: Poinsettias, Holly hock, Pine, Mistletoe ♥

*Birds: Doves, Cardinal, Blue-jays, Swallows

*Woodland creatures: Squirrels, Deer, Bunnies, Foxes, Bears

*Ribbons, Trim, Lace, Wrapping Paper Prints (Especially vintage prints)

*Crosses, Angels

*Snowflakes, Icicles, Snow people, Ice skates, frost

*Victorian prints: Usually involving Santa, Presents, Kittens, elves

*Bells, Harps, Violins

*Candles, sparkles

*Hot Cocoa, tea, spices, mince meat pies, pastries, cookies, desserts

*Stocking, Ornaments, Berries

Now then, I hope that I have helped you get a new start in your wardrobe! Go out and have fun~ (^____^)

I've chosen "Pink" as my new inspiration

BABY, THE STARS SHINE BRIGHT (Bunny Milk)